City of Loveland contractor begins spraying for mosquitoes

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City of Loveland contractor begins spraying for mosquitoes

A city of Loveland contractor has begun monitoring and spraying for mosquitoes, as warming weather encourages the airborne pests to take wing. Vector

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A city of Loveland contractor has begun monitoring and spraying for mosquitoes, as warming weather encourages the airborne pests to take wing.

Vector Disease Control International is currently tracking mosquito activity, testing captured insects for the West Nile virus and spraying an insecticide over targeted areas.

According to a city press release, known areas of standing water are being sampled weekly by the contractor to be tested for mosquito larva and treated with larvicide, if necessary.

Area spraying is only conducted when adult mosquito populations reach target thresholds or when the prevalence of diseases such as West Nile is elevated.

For example, mosquitoes in the genus Culex are the main carriers of West Nile in the area. When VDCI detects more than 50 individual Culex mosquitoes in a trap for a given zone, the company will initiate spraying of that zone in order to reduce the threat of disease.

Residents can see a current, interactive map of all Loveland mosquito surveillance data by zone, including mosquito quantities, West Nile virus activity and planned spray schedules at tinyurl.com/phznddyb.

Loveland spray schedules can be found at www.vdci.net/colorado-schedules under the “Larimer County” heading. Residents who would like to receive a call notification before spraying begins and residents who want to submit a shut-off request can contact the contractor at www.vdci.net/colorado/#2.

In addition to mosquito mitigation through VDCI, the city is offering tips to help prevent West Nile virus disease. Remember to use the four D’s:

  • DEET or other mosquito repellent — use an Environmental Protection Agency-registered mosquito repellent that has been proven to be effective against West Nile virus-carrying mosquitoes. DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus (also called p-menthane-3,8-diol or PMD) and IR3535 are good choices.
  • Dusk to dawn — avoid exposure during peak Culex mosquito feeding times.
  • Dress – wear long sleeves and pants to keep mosquitoes from biting.
  • Drain – remove standing water on and around private property. Almost any water, even a very small amount, that stands for more than five days has the potential to produce mosquitoes.

For information on Loveland mosquito activity, please visit www.lovgov.org/mosquitocontrol or www.vdci.net/colorado.

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